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20130101
20130131
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
sawyer, a customs inspector and volunteer fireman in san francisco, whose name twain would immortalize in his novel, the adventures of tom sawyer. the two met in 1863 when the 20 year-old mark twain befriended mr. sawyer over cards and drinks. it was during these casual meetings that sawyer relates -- relayed to twain stories of his youth. >> well, i actually left my cave. in the mornings i get up and at early dawn, and i haven't does provide editors the drawing. i like the drawing best. and that work -- i've had 10 books. all illustrated. i'm just having such a great time doing this stuff. so they asked me when i came your what were my prerequisites for writing the book. it's got to be simply place am going to write it, it takes 15 years, i've had books take that long, i'm going to finish but the other one, there can be another book. they can't be another book under the subject. i like a subject that's never been touched or you have the challenge of going back and digging and digging and bringing this to life. and the rule i have is let's say tom sawyer our mark twain came back today,
: laurents is the owner of city lights bookstore in san francisco and what was it like back then? it. >> guest: a carnival of ids of place people would go to buy books or me inspired. the prize-winning american writer told me it was a great bookstore and a good place to pick up checks for entertainment and to have the peace demonstration a place where jerry garcia would meet there when the parents of a girlfriend had no idea what was going on. almost anything could happen >> host: how will you interested in his life? >> guest: i went to the bookstore in the bay area. later when i worked for the bookstore with the free university policies would encircle 1 degree orencircle 1 r for i corrupt buying books from him and it dawned on me there is a booktv written about the totality of his life. >> host: does is still exist? >> guest: when data is business in 2005 that the community would not allow it and put back into business after raising money. this year again the sun would put out of business and once again the community raised seven and a thousand dollars for the bookstore was sold to
. rusher always remained very proud of that. he retired in san francisco. he loved the climate. he loved the relative sophistication of san francisco. he had fallen in love with this in '50s, and lived there for the last 20 years of his life, and i will leave you with this quote which also gives a sense of rusher0s attitude. in my last interview with him he said to me, san francisco has a dreadful reputation among conservatives, and new yorkers are always raising the subject with me. mostly new yorkers. he said i just dismiss it. i'm not the least bit interested in what the majority of people in san francisco think. i like the food. i like the weather. i like the am beens. at it where i want to live. and if they want to live there, too the liberals, good luck. >> i'll be eager for your questions. [applause] >> if you will, just raise your hand. we have a gentleman with the microphone, and if you will please give your name and then ask your question. hopefully not -- it's a question and not a statement. but all depends. please, first question. down here. thank you. >> you mentioned how ru
advice that they had time for him he always remained very proud at that. he retired to san francisco, she liked the climate and the relative sophistication of san francisco. he had fallen in love with in the 50's and so he lived there about that last 20 years of his life. and i will leave you with this quote which also gives you a sense of his attitude. and perhaps my last interview with him he said to me san francisco has a dreadful reputation among the conservatives and the new yorkers are always raising the subject with me mostly new yorkers. he said i just dismiss it. i'm not the least bit interested in the majority of people in san francisco think. i like the food, i like the weather, i like the ambiance. it's where i want to live and if they want to live there, too, the liberals, good luck. i will be eager for your questions so long as we have time for it. [applause] >> if you will just raise your hand. we do have a gentleman with the microphone. and if you will please come give your name and then ask your question. hopefully a question and not a statement. yes, please come first qu
great advice, had time for them. rusher always remained very proud of that. he retired to san francisco, loved the climate, relative sophistication of san francisco. he had fallen in love with it in the 50s so he lived there the last 20 years of his life. i will leave you with this quote which gives a sense of rusher's attitude. perhaps my last interview with him, he said to me san francisco has a dreadful reputation among conservatives and new yorkers are always raising the subject with me, mostly new yorkers. i am not interested in what people in san francisco think. i like the food, the weather, the ambiance, it is where i want to live. if they want to live there too, the liberals, good luck. i will be eager for your questions as far as we have time. [applause] >> if you will just raise your hand, the gentleman with a microphone, please give your name and ask your question. hopefully a question, not a statement. first question down here. >> you mentioned how rusher wanted to take a populist tone. you think that -- >> speak up just a bit. >> a more populist tone to the conservative mo
's on the west coast. so i know there's a few bookstores in san francisco. what you have here is very special. want to acknowledge a couple of groups but if you're interested in urban design issues in this area, groups to talk to first problem is see in your casket, the congress for urban is him. i'm sure you can find an online. but they are concerned about all the issues i'll be talking about tonight and there's a group that for 20 years now has been pushing these issues forward the strongest. i want to acknowledge the mayor who i'm so glad he is sure mayor. because i've been following him and working in direct with him for many years and seen the great things he's done to i'm sorry he couldn't be here tonight. but i'm sure there are different opinions in the room, democracy, but he's someone i admire tremendously. and i want to acknowledge the national threat institute. i'm on the advisory board. the national institute israel is in the world that pushes forward -- they invented, or we invented the return to the traditional neighborhood as alternative to suburban sprawl but they also greater
to describe a particular pattern in san francisco. in which the welfare department has figured out that all of the senior welfare people should be on the second floor of the welfare office hiding from the people that they serve. the newest and least be people the people should be on the ground floor screening the others. and this describes the samoan community in san francisco. having figured out what the demos. and so you have 6-foot five and 6-foot six samoans tearing traditional workloads carrying traditional clubs. they would start to shift the fourth with their clubs. and so you have a normal sized person staring up at this samoan with his war club. anything, are they pay me enough for this? thomas wolfe was one of the greatest observers in our american generation. if you've never read this, you should. everything that wolfe described in his early essays. the left has continued to mutate and evolve and metastasize and become more broke than what wolfe first described it. so now instead of it being the local samoans at the local san francisco office, it is the national news media. they
. >> well, the restaurant we used to go to in millbrae for dim sum, this is in san francisco where one of my daughters lives. they closed and so she found another dim sum place in south san francisco, whose name i can't remember, but it's on the main drag just before that. ornate city hall they have in south san francisco. i'll think of the name may be before the end of the evening. probably not. [laughter] >> i really enjoy your book american stories that was always kind of curious about the process of researching the stories. i sort of understand only basically that they were derived from newspaper headlines i think. >> no, they were derived from my going to work for bias in reporting the story. newspaper headlines -- by dragging maybe that's how i found out about them. >> i was curious because there must've been 90 as he pursued in did not turn into stories in the book and i wondered if there is any interesting stories that came out of that process. >> usually i went to a place because i had read some thing about the story or somebody phone me or wrote me a letter. usually i ended up with
, this is in san francisco, where one of my daughters lives. they closed and so she found another dim sum place in south san francisco, which name i can't remember, but it's on that main drive just before that. ornate city hall they have in south san francisco. i'll think of that name may be before the end of the evening. probably not. [laughter] >> i really enjoy your book, american story. i was always kind of curious about the process of researching the stories. i understandably basically that they were derived from newspaper headlines they think. >> they derived from my going to wherever it was in reporting the story. newspaper headlines -- buy direct to he means that's how i found out about them. >> i'm curious because i figured there must of been ideas that she pursued that did not turn into stories in the book and i'm wondering if there's any interesting stories that came out of that process. >> usually i went to a place because i had read something about it in a story or somebody found mia wrote me a letter. usually i ended up with that story, almost always good partly because i thought
. now i have two kids and everything changed. it is that, got friends in san francisco who want to see me. another some good hucksters in san francisco. what you have here is very special. i want to acknowledge a couple groups if you're interested in urban design issues in this area, the group to talk to first base enu cascadia for new urbanism and i'm sure you can find them online, but they're concerned about the issues of the talking about tonight and descriptive for 20 years has in pushing these issues forward the strongest. i want to acknowledge the mayor who i'm so glad he is your mayor because i've been following him and working indirectly for many years and seeing great things he's done. i'm sorry you couldn't either tonight. but i'm sure there's different opinions in the room. it's a democracy, but he's someone someone i admire tremendously. i went to his knowledge the national charrette to do, but i'm actually under a storyboard. the only as a dude in a row forward -- they reinvented a return to the traditional neighborhood as an alternative, but they also created the planning
francisco. he love the climate. he loved the relative sophistication of san francisco. he had fallen in love with it in the 50s and so he lived there for the last 20 years of his life. and i will leave you with this quote which also gives a sense of rusher attitude. in perhaps my last interview with him, he said to me, san francisco has a dreadful reputation among conservatives. and new yorkers are always raising the subject with me. mostly in new york. he said i just dismiss it. i'm not the least bit interested in what the majority of people in san francisco think. i like the food. i like the weather. i like the ambience. it's where i want to live in if they want to live there to, the liberals, good luck. i will be eager for your questions and so far as we have time for. [applause] >> if you will just raise your hand. we do have a microphone and if you'll please give your name and then ask your question. hopefully a basic question and not a statement. yes, please. down here. thank you. >> you mentioned how rusher wanted to take a more populist tone at some point. >> can you speak up just a
treatment? >> guest: oh, my goodness. i think i wax most poetically about the bay area, san francisco. i did--actually just came back from there and i must say, i just--aesthetically, it's one of the most pleasing places in the world because you've just got all these multiplicity of skin colors. i mean, just all these cultures stewed together and it just feels affluent and the weather is--in grand. but, you know, that being said, there's so many lovely places i did encounter. i mean, i fell in love with the desert. i fell in love with alaska. and there's certain charms in new england that you can't match. c-span: you say you learned that the alcan highway was built by blacks? >> guest: yes, this was after i had driven it and sort of had this sort of spiritual moment on kluane lake, which is this large glacial lake up in the yukon, and i got up there and i, you know, found out--and this was after having picked up all these souvenirs and--and books about the alcan highway, which folks don't know is about 1,900 miles long. c-span: where do you get it? where do you start--where do you start driv
back to san francisco and he is tried on violating neutrality rules, he goes free because you can't find a jury to convict him, because a lot of americans still believe in manifest destiny. it's when walker gets to central america and becomes the president of nicaragua that he becomes a huge national figure. so there's a lot of people in america who really still have these very expansive views of what the the united states can become. it's not unusual for people to talk about the united states encompassing all of central america, canada, perhaps even south america. this is what people think is going to happen. how do you deal with that situation? well, it's not a coincidence that william walker basically supports slavery. so his idea of how to deal with racial issues is to bring african slaves into tease areas, you know, and some people are talking about how perhaps we should enslave central more thans themselves. so it's a very, it's a strange and unusual situation but, yeah, i think filibustering exists very uneasily with the u.s./mexico war. but by no means does the close of th
. there was all kinds of trouble at the u.n. organizing conference in san francisco. so her job was to administer the medication medications and keep him off the brandy. louise macey was a character. so they arrived in moscow. harry spent seven or eight days meeting with stalin to try to figure out why everything was falling apart. stalin had an opportunity to really lay out all of his grievances about the united states. among them being the united states abruptly cut off relief aid and surrender to russia. stalin was not at all happy about that. so the primary issue had to do with the organization and the polish government and who would be in the government. in the agreements were as loose as could possibly be. stalin was supposed to reorganize the government. and of of course, he of here this early, the only thing he cared about was protecting its borders. he didn't care about the u.n. he didn't care about reparations, and that was not his primary concern. his primary concern was territorial protections security forces country. so they went back and forth on that. the hopkins got nowhere on the
took office. molotov was causing all kinds of trouble with the u.n. organizing conference in san francisco and the polish underground people being arrested and so forth. so truman sent hot games to moscow. this is his last mission. he was quite sick. but he took his third wife with him and her job was to administer the medication and keep them off the brandy. she nicknamed the plane that they flew over to moscow the flying boudoir. that was luis macy. she was a dear. they arrived in moscow and harry spent seven or eight days ending with stalin, to try to figure out why everything was falling apart. stalin had an opportunity to really lay out all of his grievances about the united states. among them being the united states abruptly cut off the minute the german surrender to russia. and stalin was not at all happy about that. so the issue -- the primary issue has to do with the organization of the polish government and who would be in that government. the oslo agreements were a slapstick of those as they could possibly be. all they said was that stalin was supposed to reorganize th
to of franklin d. roosevelt, acting secretary-general of united nations' founding conference in san francisco and recently named president of the carnegie endowment for national peace. he emphatically denied chambers's allegation. a great deal more than the reputations of these two men was at stake. if this was innocent, anti communism, and those closely associated with the like richard nixon. it was dealt a devastating blow. if alger hiss was guilty, anti communism would occupy a prominent part of the political landscape, and his spokesman would become national leaders. furthermore, chambers and alger hiss each represented one side in the epic struggle of the cold war. one man symbolized the philosophy of freedom and western civilization. the other the ideology of totalitarianism and marxism and leninism. both left and right understood that america and the world was at a critical point in history. considered a major political events had transpired between august of 1948 when chambers confronted alger hiss at a congressional hearing. in may of 1952 when chambers published his managerial and m
to franklin d. roosevelt the acting secretary general from the founding conference it in san francisco and also named from the carnegie endowment for peace and a radically denied chambers allocation. a great deal more than the rest of station was at stake into communism and those associated with nixon a prominent member of the committee would be dealt a devastating blow. the guilty and communism occupy a part of the political landscape and furthermore chambers and hiss each represented one side. one represented freedom and western civilization and the other the etiology of totalitarianism. both the left and the right to understood america and the world was at a critical point* in history consider the major political events that transpired between august 1948 when chambers confronted hiss and may 1952 when chambers published "witness." 1948 the communists through a justice of akia coup d'etat the first seizure by force of a popular government and spending washington. at the shanghai shacked the following year the communist would assume command of the world's most populist nation. 1950 w
and peggy noonan and michael daley but then jack london talking about the 1906 earthquake in san francisco and it has a sense of a perspective that we've visited a lot of this stuff before and great storytelling creates a perspective on our own problems. >> the destruction that is almost never talk about outside of texas puts to shame what's happened in new york with the hurricane. hundreds of thousands of people affected, destroyed and to read about it and see that there were people on the ground who knew about it and cared about it and were wondering at a time will anybody remember this and when the years have gone by it's really important for people to get the perspective. >> when we balance the scandals and the tragedies as well it's amazing when you read the perfect game the column where he calls him the cinderella man that is later made into a movie has never been before. we found it in the new york public library you get these great inspiring stories along with the stories and scandals and you know what the news cycle was right now in the sex scandal it really does show you we've be
is steve lopez and peggy noonan, but then you read jack london about the 1906 earthquake in san francisco and it does create a sense of perspective. we been through a lot of this stuff before and it's great storytelling that creates perspective on our problems. the instruction of galveston outside of texas puts to shame i just have been in new york with hurricane stan knee. hundreds of thousands of people affect it, destroy to see there were people on the ground who knew about it, cared about it and were even wondering at the time, will anyone remember this? will people remember what happened to this town. it's important for people to get that data. thematically balanced tragedy to triumph as well. when you need surely povich on john larsen's perfect game, damon runyon's column where he calls cinderella man, later made into a movie. we found it in the new york public library, see her get these inspiring stories across with this scandal, tragedy and triumph. the new cycle right now involving a scandal really does show you we've been through this stuff before. every generation replaced ephe
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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